So why do we need to communicate?

It is rare when I tell someone that you work as a public relations consultant that people instantly know what you are talking about, which is ironic for an industry that centres around communication.

Communication is one of the most basic elements that makes up the social fabric of our world. The ability of humans to be able to tell, listen, inform, explain, persuade, read, write, draw and watch is what allows us to organise towards a common purpose.

As a public relations and communications consultant, my role is to look at the way that organisations are communicating and ensuring that their communication is the most effective for its audience and its purpose. It may be looking at how an organisation communications as a whole (communication strategy), how it communicates to meet a specific objective (a public relations campaign), how it deals with potential threats (issues management), how it engages with the community (community engagement) or how it deals with specific audiences (internal, stakeholders, media).

How does it differ from marketing?

Marketing’s purpose is the create and bring to market a product that meets the needs or adds value to the target audience.

The purpose of public relations is much broader and deals with all of the groups that an organisation must deal with to make sure it has a positive environment from which to conduct its business.

Think of these groups and how important it may be to communicate with them:

  • Your employees who are the face of your product, service and organisation
  • Government authorities who create the regulatory environment for you to operate in
  • Media who can give third-party endorsement to your products, company and brand
  • Unions, professional bodies and your industry (including your competitors) who may have an impact on your operations or on the standing of your industry
  • The local community in which you operate

While public relations can be used to directly support marketing, think about how difficult it may be for an organisation to conduct its business, if it loses the relationship with any of the groups above?

The things I have learnt from parenting blogs

As most communication and public relations professionals would be well-aware, in our industry you need to keep up to date with the happenings in a range of different offline and online mediums that are relevant to your clients. This is compounded when working in an agency environment where you need to keep up to date with a number of industries at the same time.

This element of agency work is attractive to my easily bored Gemini personality, as my work at Fentons has seen me get into the world of emergency management, deal with government at all levels, get my head around the professional services industry, become an expert on water and electricity supply (there was a point where I could name all the major connecting powerlines in Victoria as we drove past them) and meet a number of wonderful people in my work in the community sector.

Lately, I have been continuing my focus into the world of parenting. While I don’t have kids myself yet, I am the proud uncle to four little ones, including a nephew who is now five days old.

Part of my focus into the world of parenting is keeping up with Australia’s mummy and daddy bloggers, which helps to keep abreast of what is happening in the home. What I have found, however, is that the musings from parenting bloggers are quite relevant to those of us without kids as well – which explains their popularity in Australia.

Here’s some examples:

  • On Tahlia’s The Parenting Files you will find a funny story about surprises that parents find in the bathroom. Not that indifferent to some of the surprises that you find living with housemates. Except its cuter when kids do it.
  • You’re never too old to have a Spiderman birthday cake
  • There are some great tips for the kitchen. Thanks to One Crafty Mama for a great post on spice storage. The number of spices in my kitchen has been doing my head in for a while now.
  • As Rhianna on A Parenting Life‘s recent post shows, there are always distinct advantages to leaving things to the last minute…..

Thank you for some great posts (there are too many to mention!).

Ensuring our students are prepared for the PR of now

Great post in social media today about the need for universities to ensure that PR students have the business acumen to place strategy behind the social media that they are increasingly native to.

It is scary to think that there are still courses out there who are only looking at social media as the big thing of the future, when in reality it is here and now. Read the post at the link below

http://socialmediatoday.com/claire-faucett/273562/pr-students-these-days-are-thirsty#comment-30072